Ground design

‘Biophilic’ skyscraper packed with 80,000 factories opens in Singapore

in Singapore. Gardens are in the sky to fight pollution. Trees and plants grow in the skyscrapers of the city. The last building is 27 floors. Located in the middle of the business district, it will soon be covered in greenery with its exterior aluminum structure. The building houses a vertical forest ***. It has already won awards for innovation and best skyscraper. Thanks in part to its architect, we have selected more than 21 species of creepers, therefore mainly based on their adaptability to sun and shade. Over time you see the greenery begin to interact to overlap, some faster, some slower, so it becomes a living *** war. Another building in Singapore recently broke the Guinness World Record for the tallest vertical garden in the world with 2,288 square meters of greenery. It’s a cool haven for its residents like Zach. He helps run the co-op which owns 500 eco-friendly luxury apartments. No stone was left aside by the architects who imagined this place. We have a *** slope that actually leads to a *** rainwater harvesting system. So what happens when it rains is the water goes downhill in a *** filter system which filters out all the contaminants that water is used to irrigate plants throughout the residential development thanks to the vegetation wall. The temperature here is 3° cooler and this saves the cooperative €420,000 in electricity bills *** year. That’s 30% less per resident plant. Cools the air by capturing C. 02 and fine particles and allows biodiversity to flourish again in this part of the city. This is, according to one of the buildings, 10 full-time gardeners. Sometimes I see the butterfly flying around with these particle gardens and harming the birds and the worms to everyone I love because, um, I naturally think that Singapore is one of the most densely populated cities in the world , it is also becoming one of the greenest in the world.

‘Biophilic’ skyscraper packed with 80,000 factories opens in Singapore

Finding room for green spaces is a challenge in any city, let alone the most densely populated cities in the world. So, in downtown Singapore, anyone looking for a new park to stroll around may need to look to the sky. At a third of the height of the recently completed CapitaSpring Tower, the glass and aluminum facade seemingly opens to reveal plants and trees sprouting hundreds of feet above the ground. At street level, passers-by and office workers can queue for an elevator to this so-called “green oasis” – a spiraling garden path that winds past exercise equipment, benches and chairs. tables on its journey through four floors of tropical flora. At 919 feet, CapitaSpring is now one of the tallest skyscrapers in the Asian city-state. The building is privately owned by real estate giants CapitaLand and Mitsubishi Estate, with investment bank JP Morgan among its corporate tenants. But in line with the government’s desire to ensure that Singapore’s business district offers residents more than just offices, the developer has opened up some of the tower’s landscaped areas to the public. There’s more above the Oasis: on the top floor of the building, visitors can stroll through a 4,500 square foot rooftop farm that provides fruits, vegetables, herbs and edible flowers to three restaurants on site. During CNN’s visit to the building, an urban farmer who tends to the garden estimated that it generates 154 to 220 pounds of produce every month. includes a shaded covered place at its base. According to Danish firm Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), which designed the tower in collaboration with Carlo Ratti Associati, most of the plant species found throughout the site are native to Singapore and therefore adapted to the heat and humidity all over the world. ‘year. The architects describe CapitaSpring, which debuted in 2018, as “biophile,” an increasingly popular term that describes the integration of nature and design. The company said in a press release that the placement of greenery “mimics the plant hierarchy of tropical rainforests,” with those that require the least direct light under a “canopy” of taller trees. “Due to the uniqueness of Singapore’s urban planning – both extremely dense and green – we decided to make the design a vertical exploration of tropical urban planning,” said BIG founder Bjarke Ingels in a statement, adding that the tower is “like a vision of a future in which city and countryside, culture and nature can coexist.”

Finding room for green spaces is a challenge in any city, let alone the most densely populated cities in the world. So, in downtown Singapore, anyone looking for a new park to stroll in may need to look to the sky.

At a third of the height of the recently completed CapitaSpring Tower, the glass and aluminum facade seemingly opens to reveal plants and trees growing hundreds of feet above the ground. At street level, passers-by and office workers can queue for an elevator to this so-called “green oasis” – a spiraling garden path that winds past exercise equipment, benches and chairs. tables as it travels through four floors of tropical flora.

At 919 feet, CapitaSpring is now one of the tallest skyscrapers in the Asian city-state. The building is privately owned by real estate giants CapitaLand and Mitsubishi Estate, with investment bank JP Morgan among its corporate tenants. But in line with the government’s desire to ensure Singapore’s business district offers residents more than just offices, the developer has opened up some of the tower’s landscaped areas to the public.

There’s more above the Oasis: On the building’s top floor, visitors can stroll through a 4,500-square-foot rooftop farm that provides three-tier fruits, vegetables, herbs and edible flowers. restaurants on site. During CNN’s visit to the building, an urban farmer who tends to the garden estimated that it generates 154 to 220 pounds of produce each month.

capitaspring singapore skyscraper

Courtesy of Finbarr Fallon/Bjarke Ingels Group

A publicly accessible urban farm stands 919 feet above the ground.

In total, the 51-story building houses more than 80,000 trees and plants in 90,000 square feet of landscaped space, which also includes a shaded covered plaza at its base. According to Danish company Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), which designed the tower in collaboration with Carlo Ratti Associati, most of the plant species found at the site are native to Singapore and therefore adapted to the heat and humidity throughout the day. year.

The architects describe CapitaSpring, which debuted in 2018, as “biophile,” an increasingly popular term that describes the integration of nature and design. The company said in a press release that the placement of greenery “mimics the plant hierarchy of tropical rainforests”, with those that require the least direct light lying under a “canopy” of taller trees.

“Due to the uniqueness of Singapore’s urban planning – both extremely dense and green – we decided to make the design a vertical exploration of tropical urban planning,” said BIG founder Bjarke Ingels in a statement, adding that the tower is “like a vision”. of a future where city and countryside, culture and nature can coexist.”